Hurricane Irene report authors join forces with Emergency 2.0 Wiki

Hurricane Irene report

We are thrilled to announce that best practice learnings from the social media response to Hurricane Irene, which struck the east coast of the US and the Caribbean in August will be incorporated into the Wiki.

The report, “Hurricane Irene: an analysis of the use of social media, crowdsourcing and crisis mapping,” a collaborative, voluntary and open source effort, is one of the most comprehensive analysis to date of the use of social media in disasters.

As stated in our August blog post:

“The US response to Hurricane Irene has raised the bar in using social media in emergencies. The actions of emergency agencies, government agencies, not for profits, the volunteer technical community, the media and the general public were impressive and inspirational. We look forward to these learnings being incorporated into the Wiki to share with the global community.”

This ‘appeal to the crowd’ is now going to be a reality thanks to this report and lead author Patrice Cloutier, an emergency management communications expert who works for the Ontario Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services in Canada, and who has generously agreed to volunteer his time to lead the Wiki Emergency Response Reference Group.

This Reference Group will lead the content development, management and promotion of two sections of the wiki:

  1. Tips for the Public, What to do during an Emergency
  2. Guidelines for emergency services, government, business, schools etc

Patrice will work with the report’s contributors (and anyone else who is keen) to incorporate key learnings into practical guidelines. This will include examples of the social media response from:

  • Local/municipal agencies and entities: including New York City, Washington DC, New Jersey and many cities in the impact zone
  • Federal agencies: including The Department of Homeland Security and White House, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Weather Service (NWS) and National Hurricane Centre
  • State Agencies: including The Virginia Department of Emergency Management, Delaware, New Jersey, Massachussets and Vermont
  • NGOs and Service Agencies: including The American Red Cross, Salvation Army and the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals
  • Volunteer Technical Communities: including Crisis Commons, Humanity Road and Crisis Mappers
  • Media and the Private Sector: including the New York Times, radio station WNYC,  and the Weather Channel
  • Business: including Google and Facebook
  • Citizens: including Sara Estes Cohen who created a Twitter list of key agencies

The report is currently being finalised and is still open for input, so if you would like to help on that front, please send through your report comments and suggestions to patricecloutiermcscs@gmail.com. You can also read more about the report and its contributors on his crisis comms command post blog. We have linked to the report on the Emergency 2.0 Wiki Reports page, Library page, under references on the Emergency Preparation page and Emergency Response page.

If you’d like to help Patrice and the Reference Group incorporate the report’s key learnings into the Wiki, you are absolutely welcome! It takes a community to create a wiki and we need your help! Just remember that you will need to first register via the Emergency 2.0 Wiki LinkedIn Group. This is your gateway to developing the Wiki and joining the Emergency 2.0 Wiki community!

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  1. […] A comprehensive study into the use of social media during Hurricane Irene is being published in a wiki. […]

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