New UN global framework for disaster risk reduction contains social media

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon speaking at the opening of the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon speaking at the opening of the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction in Sendai, Japan

Success! We are thrilled to report that the new United Nations global framework for disaster risk reduction, ratified in Sendai, Japan, now contains social media!

The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030, adopted by the UN General Assembly at the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (WCDRR) in Sendai, Japan, last week, now incorporates social media.

This is an exciting outcome, which we believe will have a great impact on the global acceleration of the use of social media for disaster resilience, leading to substantial reduction of disaster risk and losses in lives, property and livelihoods and a faster, stronger recovery.

We are also celebrating because the Emergency 2.0 Wiki helped influence this outcome through our presentation and recommendations to the 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference Davos (IDRC2014), which provided the science and technology input toward the new Framework.

Our key recommendations and correlating Framework outcomes (bold emphasis added) are below:

Wiki Recommendation: Incorporate social media into mainstream emergency communications

Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030

Priority 1. Understanding Disaster Risk
  1. (m) Promote national strategies to strengthen public education and awareness in disaster risk reduction, including disaster risk information and knowledge, through campaigns, social media and community mobilization, taking into account specific audiences and their needs.
  1. (c) Strengthen the utilization of media, including social media, traditional media, big data and mobile phone networks to support national measures for successful disaster and risk communication, as appropriate and in accordance with national laws.
  1. (b) Invest in, develop, maintain and strengthen people-centred multi-hazard, multisectoral forecasting and early warning systems, disaster risk and emergency communications mechanisms, social technologies and hazard monitoring telecommunications systems.

In addition to this, although no specific mention was made of social media in the following outcomes, we were delighted to see the Framework incorporate the essence of many of our other recommendations including:

Wiki Recommendation: Take a whole of community partnership approach

Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030

Guiding Principles
  1. (d) Disaster risk reduction requires an all of society engagement and partnership.
Priority 2: Strengthening disaster risk governance to manage disaster risk
  1. (h) Empower local authorities, as appropriate, through regulatory and financial means, to work and coordinate with civil society, communities and indigenous peoples and migrants in disaster risk management at the local level.
Role of stakeholders
  1. …. Non-state stakeholders play an important role as enablers in providing support to States… their commitment, goodwill, knowledge, experience and resources will be required.
  1. (a) Civil society, volunteers, organized voluntary work organisations and community based organisations to participate, in collaboration with public institutions…. In the development and implementation of normative frameworks, standards and plans for disaster risk reduction; engage in the implementation of local, national, regional and global plans and strategies: contribute to and support public awareness, a culture of prevention and education on disaster risk; and advocate for resilient communities and an inclusive, all-of-society disaster risk management which strengthen the synergies across groups as appropriate.

Wiki Recommendation: Capacity build the community – provide education and information

Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030

Priority 1: Understanding Disaster Risk
  1. (g) Build the knowledge of government officials at all levels, civil society, communities and volunteers, as well as the private sector, through sharing experiences, lessons learned, good practices and training and education on disaster risk reduction, including the use of existing training education mechanisms and peer learning.
Priority 4: Enhancing disaster preparedness for effective response and the “Build Back Better” in recovery, rehabilitation and reconstruction
  1. (f) Train the existing workforce and voluntary workers in disaster response and strengthen technical and logistical capacities to ensure better response in emergencies..
  1. (d) Media to: … stimulate a culture of prevention and strong community involvement in sustained public education campaigns…

Wiki Recommendation: Empower the community – provide tools and platforms

Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030

Guiding Principles
  1. (f) While the enabling, guiding and coordinating role of national and federal State Governments remain essential, it is necessary to empower local authorities and local communities to reduce disaster risk, including through resources, incentives and decision making responsibilities, as appropriate;
Priority 1: Understanding disaster risk
  1. (c) Develop, update periodically and disseminate, as appropriate, location and disaster risk information, including risk maps, to decision makers, the general public and communities at risk to disaster in an appropriate format by using, as applicable, geospatial information technology;
  1. (f) Promote real-time access to reliable data, make use of space and in situ information, including geographic information systems (GIS), and use information and communications technology innovations to enhance measurement tools and the collection, analysis and dissemination of data.

Wiki Recommendation: Empower people with a disability by providing accessible information:

Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030

Guiding Principles
  1. (d) Disaster risk reduction requires an all of society engagement and partnership. It also requires empowerment and inclusive, accessible and nondiscriminatory participation…. A gender, age, disability and cultural perspective in all policies and practices;

Wiki Recommendation: The need for agencies to work more closely with digital volunteer groups:

Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030

Guiding Principles
  1. (d) … special attention should be paid to the improvement of organized voluntary work of citizens;
Priority 1: Understanding disaster risk
  1. (o) Enhance collaboration among people at the local level to disseminate risk information through the involvement of community based organizations and non-governmental organizations.
Priority 2: Strengthening disaster risk governance to manage disaster risk
  1. (h) Empower local authorities, as appropriate, through regulatory and financial means to work and coordinate with civil society, communities and indigenous peoples and migrants in disaster risk management at the local level;

We would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge and thank the efforts of the many participants from the global disaster risk reduction community who also advocated for these outcomes.

We look forward to helping the international community implement the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015 – 2030 and utilise social media and new technologies to make our world more disaster resilient.

Many thanks,

Eileen Culleton, Founder and CEO (voluntary), Emergency 2.0 Wiki

Related Links and Articles:

Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030.pdf

#IDRC2014… we came, we saw, we shared with the world

Emergency 2.0 Wiki article in Global Risk Forum Davos Planet @ Risk, Volume 3, No 1, Special Issue on the IDRC Davos Outcomes, for the Post 2015 Framework for DRR

Imagine a world where using social media for disaster resilience is the social norm

Image Credit: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon speaking at the opening of the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction. Image via UNISDR Flickr under Creative Commons licence (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Imagine a world where using social media for disaster resilience is the social norm

 

Preparathon FB postImagine a world where using social media for disaster resilience is the social norm. Where the whole community joins together to use social media to help prepare for, respond to and recover from disasters, resulting in more lives saved, properties protected and faster community recovery.

Imagine a world where emergency services, government, NGOs, schools, hospitals, community groups, media, business and citizens use social media to inform, share and collaborate to face emergencies and disasters.

Citizens promoting resilience

Imagine a world where in the leadup to disaster seasons such as floods, the whole community uses social media to raise awareness and share preparedness plans with their friends, family and workplaces. A great example of this is America’s Preparathon! a nationwide, community based campaign by Ready.gov to increase emergency preparedness. A key strategy is TweetChats (see above).

Another key strategy is providing disaster preparedness social media toolkits for the community to use for social media sharing. See this Facebook post encouraging people to share flood safety in their community by downloading a flood safety toolkit with suggested Tweets, Facebook posts and graphics:

Floodsafety social media kit 2015-02-28_14-47-48
Empowering people with disabilities

Imagine a world where people with a disability use social media to better prepare for and respond to disasters and where the accessibility issues of using social media no longer exist. We created the Wiki Accessibility Toolkit with tips to help people with a disability overcome social media issues and to help agencies ensure their social media messages are accessible:

Wiki accessibility toolkit

Sending Twitter Alerts directly to mobile phones

Imagine a world where emergency agencies in all countries send Twitter Alerts with urgent warning messages directly to citizen’s mobile phones. Unlike a normal tweet which can be missed, in times of emergency and disaster agencies can use Twitter Alerts to send push notifications to the mobile phones of those who signup. Here is an example of a Twitter Alert by the Queensland Police warning residents to evacuate ahead of Cyclone Marcia:

Providing multi-disaster smartphone apps that alert and empower

Imagine a world where every country has a free multi-disaster smartphone app that issues push notification warnings based on geolocation, empowers citizens to act as early warning detectors, offers live tweets from key official agencies, information on how to prepare for disasters, maps pinpointing evacuation shelters, that empowers citizens to share their own photos and videos from the disaster zone and to ask for or offer assistance with emergency relief.

While we can’t yet point you to a disaster app with all these features (if you know of one please contact us and we’ll add it to our global apps directory), we believe it’s possible because there are mobile disaster apps containing many of these features, such as the US Government Federal Emergency Agency (FEMA) app below which provides disaster preparedness information, evacuation shelter lists, access to live tweets from official agencies, and enables citizens to share their own share images from disaster zones:

Fema crowdsource relief app 2014-08-26_7-25-27

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Australia’s EmergencyAus smartphone app also has a number of these features such as multi-disaster alerts, push notification warnings based on geolocation, empowering citizens to act as early warning detectors including sharing photos from the scene, and to ask for or offer emergency relief. NB: this is not an official government app:

Emergency Aus app screenshot 2015

Crowdsourcing information

Imagine a world where emergency services partner with the community to crowdsource localized information from citizens. Where along with providing mobile apps enabling citizen information sharing, they also provide online crowdmaps with emergency information, which easily enable posting by the community via text, Tweet or email. For example this Tweet by Brisbane City Council promotes a crowdmap they created during the Queensland Floods in Australia in 2013 using a free user-friendly crowdmap provided by Ushahidi:

BCCfloodcrowdmaptweet 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Health services alerting to  pandemics and disaster response

Imagine if agencies in all countries used social media to instantly broadcast pandemic alerts and warnings to citizens, including information on how to prevent the spread of infection. For example with the Ebola outbreak, Nigeria agencies successfully used Twitter and Facebook to send alerts and infection control information to quickly contain the outbreak:

EbolaAlert, a nonprofit and volunteer lead initiative were key to this, and after their success in Nigeria they are operating in the other Ebola affected African countries.

Imagine a world where health services in every country use social media during disasters to alert the community to important updates such as hospital evacuations and closures, updates to patient’s families and to employees on reporting for work. See these tweets by New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation during Hurricane Sandy that struck the US in 2012:

nycsandyhospitaltweets - Copy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below is a tweet from Queensland Health on restoration of power to key hospitals after the recent Tropical Cyclone Marcia that struck northern Australia:

Digital volunteers provide information aid

Imagine a world where digital volunteers specialising in disaster response were utilised by all countries to provide ‘information aid’, helping emergency services monitor social media, respond to calls for help and map damage. The Digital Humanitarian Network (see below), Humanity Road and Virtual Operations Support Teams (VOST) are doing great work around the world assisting emergency service agencies in times of emergencies and disaster.

DHNetwork Activations Map 2015-02-27_17-04-08

 

Empowering communities to directly help each other in recovery

Imagine a world where in the recovery phase, social media, mobile apps and crowdmaps are used to empower communities to directly help one another by donating and accessing relief supplies, accommodation and volunteer help. Below is an example of a crowdmap for disaster relief after Hurricane Sandy 2013:

Hurricane Sandy Recovery Crowdmap

 

Together we can create this world!

We believe that together we can create such a world, because as we have demonstrated, there are examples of this already happening.

But we still have a long way to go before using social media for disaster resilience becomes a social norm… where the whole of the community: emergency services, government, NGOs, hospitals, schools, community groups, business, media and citizens join together to use social media to inform, share and collaborate to face emergencies and disasters.

Capacity building and empowerment

We believe what is needed is capacity building by providing the ‘know how’ for using social media and new technologies in the disaster context, and empowerment by providing access to the tools to enable the community to help themselves and each other.

The Emergency 2.0 Wiki, as an online global information hub and collaborative knowledge sharing model crowdsourcing the latest technology and best practices for using social media for disaster resilience, is committed to capacity building and empowering communities.

The wiki has tips and resources for citizens, emergency agencies, local government, schools, hospitals, NGOs, community groups and business to use social media to better prepare for, respond to and recover from emergencies and disasters. We encourage you to use the resources, adapt our tips for your own messaging and link to us.

We also encourage you to follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and join our LinkedIn group.

Changing policy

We believe that governments also need policy change to ensure agencies integrate social media into emergency management and disaster resilience and we are advocating for this. We also believe this policy change needs to incorporate a whole of community partnership approach to using social media for disaster resilience. Watch this space for a report on the anticipated inclusion of social media in the new global disaster framework to be ratified at the Third World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (WCDRR) to be held in Sendai City in Japan this week 14-18 March.

We made recommendations for the technological input toward the post 2015 framework via a special conference, the 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference (IDRC Davos 2014) coordinated by the Global Risk Forum in collaboration with the UNISDR. We encourage you to add your voice to the online policy debate for WCDRR via #WCDRR and #Road2sendai.

We need you!

Thewikineedsyou

Volunteers

Social media and new technology is changing so rapidly that what is best practice today for using social media in emergencies and disasters is not best practice tomorrow. It’s why the Emergency 2.0 Wiki is such an important resource – we save people time trying to ‘reinvent the wheel’ by providing up to date information and tips on using the new technologies in the emergency context.

As a volunteer driven non profit, we are always on the lookout for volunteers keen to share their knowledge and to help us drive and promote the wiki. See How to Help for more information.

Alliances

We are looking to increase our knowledge sharing alliances with like-minded organisations. For more information please contact our CEO Eileenculleton@gmail.com

Sponsors

We are looking for sponsors to partner with us to support our operations and to deliver key initiatives such as our proposed Community Resilience Toolkit and Business Resilience Toolkit. To discuss please contact our CEO Eileenculleton@gmail.com.

Pro bono partners

We are seeking pro bono partners to provide accounting, web and graphic design services. To discuss please contact our CEO Eileenculleton@gmail.com.

Our Strategic Plan

Want to know more about where we are headed? Here’s a link to our Strategic Plan that we developed ‘wiki style’, by incorporating ideas crowdsourced from the online community.  We would like to take the opportunity to thank everyone who put forward their ideas.

Thank you

Thank you to our Emergency 2.0 Wiki Community who help us provide this vital resource including our volunteers, reference group members, alliance partners, pro bono partners and board members. We look forward to working with the global community in 2015 in helping make social media for disaster resilience a social norm.

Many thanks,

Eileen Culleton, Founder and CEO (voluntary)

p.s. Together we can create a world where using social media for disaster resilience is a social norm
p.p.s. Follow us on Facebook, TwitterGoogle+
 
Links

Future scenarios

#IDRC2014… we came, we saw, we shared with the world

Merry Christmas, Happy New Year and Thank You!

Christmas Lights

We would like to wish our global Emergency 2.0 Wiki community a safe and peaceful Christmas and New Year and say a big Thank You for helping us build resilient communities empowered with the knowledge to use social media in emergencies.

Sharing information and resources

Thank you to all who shared tips, news, links, apps, guidelines, research reports and other resources.

Promoting the wiki

Thank you to those who helped raise awareness of the wiki by posting links to the wiki, blogging about us and sharing our tweets, blog, Facebook and Google+ posts.

Reference Group members

Thank you to our Reference Group members for helping us develop content on the wiki and for promoting the wiki to your networks.

Alliance and collaboration partners

Thank you to our knowledge sharing alliance partners Business Continuity Institute (BCI) Australasian Chapter, the Risk Management Institution of Australasia (RMIA), and Partnerships Toward Safer Communities (PTSC-Online – Canada).

We would also like to thank VOSG (Virtual Operations Support Group for inviting us to partner with them to deliver the #SMEMau Australian Disasters Twitter Chat and Humanity Road for their leadership in managing the USA Directory on the wiki global directory.

Pro bono Partners

Thank you to our pro bono partners who freely provide their services to the Wiki: our auditors Bentleys, web host Mammoth Media, lawyers HWL Ebsworth and NFP Lawyers and our WordPress Site designer, Joanna Lane (also a wiki reference group member and NYVOST Team Lead).

Event Sponsors

We would like to thank Emergency Management Australia, of the Australian Attorney General’s Department, for sponsoring our presentation at the 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference #IDRC2014 organised by the Global Risk Forum in cooperation with the United Nations Office for Disaster Reduction (UNISDR). Through this conference we also shaped future world policy, making recommendations towards the development of the Post 2015 Disaster Risk Reduction Framework which will be ratified at the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (WCDRR) in Sendai, Japan in March 2015.

We also thank our other many supporters who contributed to make our participation at #IDRC2014 a reality.

We wish you a safe and peaceful Christmas and New Year and look forward to working with you in 2015 to help build disaster resilient communities.

With warmest wishes and lots of cheer,

Eileen Culleton, Founder and CEO (voluntary)

p.s. Together we are making a difference to build disaster resilience and save lives.
p.p.s. Follow us on Facebook

#IDRC2014 – Emergency 2.0 Wiki sponsor storify report

#IDRC2014 presThe Emergency 2.0 Wiki presentation at the 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference in Davos Switzerland (#IDRC2014) 26-28 August 2014 was made possible thanks to sponsorship by Emergency Management Australia. Here is a Storify report on how we thanked them on social media.

#IDRC2014… we came, we saw, we shared with the world!

We are pleased to share highlights of our presentation to the 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference #IDRC2014 at Davos Switzerland 24-28 August 2014, organised by the Global Risk Forum in cooperation with the United Nations Office for Disaster Reduction (UNISDR).

We were excited to have this opportunity to showcase the Emergency 2.0 Wiki on the world stage, share our message on how countries can build disaster resilience through a whole of community approach to using social media, and also influence future world policy.

It was a powerful opportunity to share how our work had supported the implementation of the Hyogo Framework for Action, and to influence future world policy, making recommendations for the Post 2015 Disaster Risk Reduction Framework to be ratified at the UN World Conference WCDRR in Sendai Japan in 2015. We did this via our presentation, an extended abstract, a personal statement and a video Red Chair Statement.

emergency2.0wiki_logo_colour_lowres (2)How our work supported the implementation of the Hyogo Framework for Action:

  • Priority 1: Promoting community participation and social networking
  • Priority 2: Providing guidance on how to act on early warnings via social media
  • Priority 3, 5: Facilitating exchange of information on good practices and lessons learned
  • Priority 4: Providing a social media accessibility toolkit for people with disabilities

csm_idrc2014_6fe511616eRecommendations to address the main gaps, needs and further steps to be addressed in the Post 2015 Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction in:

  • Research: provide practical recommendations for using social media, lessons learned, short timeframes to ensure relevance
  • Education & Training: capacity build communities to use social media
  • Implementation & Practice: provide social media tools and platforms to enable the community to help themselves and each other
  • Policy: apply a whole of community approach to using social media in disasters, recognising the potential for social media to make resilience a social norm

Red Chair Statement

To view our submission documents, please visit our policy submission page.

Our presentation

Our presentation topic was “The importance of a whole of community approach to using social media for disaster resilience and how the Emergency 2.0 Wiki can help.”

We believe that social media can play a transformative role in making disaster resilience a social norm. Social media offers the potential to help create a level of resilience that ensures communities don’t just ‘bounce back’ after a disaster, but ‘bounce forward’, becoming stronger with increased social networks, social cohesion and social capital.

This requires a ‘whole of community approach’ in which the community becomes partners in using social media for disaster resilience. We explained how along with emergency response agencies, all sectors of the community: local government, schools, hospitals, ngos, community groups, faith based groups, service clubs, business and citizens; have a role to play in disaster resilience, showcasing examples from around the world.

We also made special mention of the vital role of digital volunteers.

We emphasised the need for capacity building and to provide the social media tools to empower the community to help themselves & others in disasters #IDRC2014:

This involved highlighting the importance of empowering people with a disability to overcome social media accessibility issues to access alerts, and we showcased our social media accessibility toolkit for resilience:

Strategic Contacts

We also made strategic contacts for potential future alliances and projects. Watch this space for updates…

With thanks to our Sponsor
EMA - Stacked (3)

 

 


 

AEMKH_logo

 

 

 

We would like to thank our major sponsor, Emergency Management Australia, part of the Australian Attorney General’s Department, for making our presence at #IDRC2014 possible.

We also thank our other numerous supporters who also contributed to make this a reality.

We look forward to continuing to help the international community use social media to ensure disaster resilience becomes a social norm.

Many thanks,

Eileen

Eileen Culleton, Founder & CEO (Voluntary role)

p.s. Thank you to everyone who supported our participation in #IDRC2014… together we are making a difference to build disaster resilience and save lives.
p.p.s. Follow us on Facebook

Countdown to presenting at global disaster forum #IDRC2014

csm_idrc2014_6fe511616eWe’re counting down the days until we present on the world stage at the 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference (#IDRC2014) in Davos Switzerland on 27 August.

This conference is organised by the Global Risk Forum in cooperation with the United Nations Office for Disaster Reduction (UNISDR) and is the largest world gathering of key players in this field.

IDRC Davos 2014 (24-28 August) attempts to find solutions to today’s challenges by managing risks, reducing disasters and adapting to climate change.

Importantly, it is a powerful opportunity to influence world policy. As a speaker we will be making recommendations for the Post 2015 Disaster Risk Reduction Framework to be ratified at the UN World Conference WCDRR in Sendai Japan in 2015.

Our topic will be “The importance of a whole of community approach to using social media for disaster resilience and how the Emergency 2.0 Wiki can help.”

emergency2.0wiki_logo_colour_lowres (2)We believe that together we can help create a world where communities use social media to save not only their own lives in a disaster, but also the lives of others. A world where:

  • Emergency services use social media to issue alerts and warnings to save lives
  • Emergency agencies engage with the community as partners
  • The community is prepared, including people with a disability
  • Digital volunteers from across the globe provide ‘information aid’ during and after disasters
  • The community reaches out to help the community

We believe that social media can play a transformative role in making disaster resilience a social norm. Social media offers the potential to help create a level of resilience that ensures communities don’t just ‘bounce back’ after a disaster, but ‘bounce forward’, becoming stronger with increased social networks, social cohesion and social capital. This requires a ‘whole of community approach’ in which the community becomes partners in using social media for disaster resilience.

We will be showcasing how this can be done using best practice examples from around the world and sharing how the Emergency 2.0 Wiki, a free global resource for using social media and new technologies in disasters, can help.

With thanks to our Sponsor

EMA - Stacked (3)

 

 

 

 

AEMKH_logo

 

 

 

We would like to thank our major sponsor, Emergency Management Australia, part of the Australian Attorney General’s Department, for making our presence at #IDRC2014 possible.

A great development from Australia in recent years has been the Australian Emergency Management Knowledge Hub. The Knowledge Hub provides research, resources and news to assist evidence-based decision making for the emergency management community nationally and internationally. For a vast range of disaster related multimedia and historical information on events such as bushfires, heatwaves, floods, environmental incidents, cyclones, epidemics, earthquakes and landslides, visit the Knowledge Hub and follow them on Twitter on @AEMKH.

Eileen Culleton, Founder & CEO Emergency 2.0 Wiki, Social Media in Times of Crisis Forum

Eileen Culleton, Founder & CEO Emergency 2.0 Wiki, Social Media in Times of Crisis Forum

We are excited to have this opportunity to showcase the Emergency 2.0 Wiki on the world stage and share our message on how countries can build disaster resilience through a whole of community approach to using social media.

We also look forward to making strategic contacts to form alliances with international bodies.

Join the conversation on the conference via the hashtag #IDRC2014.

We’re now on Facebook

FB_FindUsOnFacebook-144 - Copy

 

We’re now on Facebook, so please like us and share with your networks!

Cheers,

Eileen

Eileen Culleton, Founder & CEO (Voluntary role)

PS. Together we can make our world safer…

Image Credit: Social Media in Times of Crisis National Symposium, Eidos Institute Facebook. Photographer Fiona Muirhead.

Wiki to present at global disaster forum

IDRC Davos 2014Exiting News! The Wiki has been accepted to present at the 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference (#IDRC2014) in Davos Switzerland 24-28 August. This conference is organised by the Global Risk Forum in cooperation with the United Nations Office for Disaster Reduction (UNISDR) and is the largest world gathering of key players in this field.

IDRC Davos 2014 attempts to find solutions to today’s challenges by managing risks, reducing disasters and adapting to climate change.

Our topic will be “The importance of a whole of community approach to using social media for disaster resilience and how the Emergency 2.0 Wiki can help.”

We believe that together we can help create a world where communities use social media to save not only their own lives in a disaster, but also the lives of others. A world where:

  • Emergency services use social media to issue alerts and warnings to save lives
  • Emergency agencies engage with the community as partners
  • The community is prepared, including people with a disability
  • Digital volunteers from across the globe provide ‘information aid’ during and after disasters
  • The community reaches out to help the community

We believe this involves educating and empowering all sectors of the community: emergency services, the government, NGOs, community groups, faith based groups, schools, hospitals, business, media and citizens to understand that they can all play a role in using social media to prepare for, respond to and recover from disasters.

emergency2.0wiki_logo_colour_lowres (2)We will be sharing best practice examples from around the world and showcasing how the Emergency 2.0 Wiki, a free global resource for using social media and new technologies in disasters, can help.

The Wiki serves as in information hub providing tips, guides, mobile apps, mapping tools, videos and an international directory of emergency services on social media. It has tips for citizens to help themselves and help others, an accessibility toolkit for people with disabilities and guidelines for emergency services, government, community groups and NGOs, schools, hospitals and business.

Emergency 2.0 Wiki Twitter mosaic

Emergency 2.0 Wiki Twitter mosaic

Sponsorship Opportunity

We are offering the opportunity to sponsor the Emergency 2.0 Wiki’s presentation at #IDRC2014 and receive increased brand profile through a global social media campaign.

The three phase social media campaign (pre, during and post conference) will promote our participation, raise awareness of our key presentation messages and publicly recognise and thank our sponsors. We will utilise this blog, Twitter (@emergency20wiki), Google+, Emergency 2.0 LinkedIn Group, YouTube and Facebook (coming soon).

Sponsor logos will feature on the presentation which will be posted after the conference on the Wiki, the IDRC website and this blog.

Eileen Culleton presenting at Social Media In Times of Crisis Symposium 2014. Photographer Fiona Muirhead

Emergency 2.0 Wiki Founder & CEO Eileen Culleton presenting at Social Media In Times of Crisis National Symposium.

Conference Attendees

Over 1000 participants from 100 countries will be attending #IDRC2014. These include UN agents such as UNISDR and UNSESCO, NGOs, international organisations, private sector, risk management experts, practitioners, scientists, academic sector, key players from civil society and the media. The global social media spotlight will also be on the conference via the hashtag #IDRC2014.

If you are interested in sponsorship please contact me on eileenculleton@gmail.com.

We are excited to have this opportunity to showcase the Emergency 2.0 Wiki on the world stage and make strategic contacts to form alliances with international bodies. It’s also a powerful opportunity to influence world policy: the outcomes will be presented at the UN World Conference WCDRR in Sendai Japan in March 2015 and aim to influence the post 2015 agenda such as the Post 2015 Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (HFA2), the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) or the successor of the Kyoto Protocol.

We look forward to sharing our message on the global stage and helping countries better utilise social media to build disaster resilience.

Cheers,
Eileen
Eileen Culleton, Founder & CEO (Voluntary role)
P.S. Together we can make our world safer… Thank You!
Image Credit: Social Media in Times of Crisis National Symposium, Eidos Institute Facebook. Photographer Fiona Muirhead.

Read Ahead: #SMEMau Australian Disasters Twitterchat Info 2014

emknowledge.gov.au=third-draft-blog-size-1300-x-460Thurs May 8, 1900 to 2030 US EDT / May 9, 2014 0900 to 1030 AUS AET

Adjust for your time zone here: www.timeanddate.com 90 minutes

This week, Virtual Operations Support Group will facilitate a discussion on the role of social media in the management of Australian emergencies and disasters. The first #SMEMau Special #SMEMchat event on Australian Bushfires, was hosted by VOSG in Jan 2013. Since then, the importance of new technology to manage all aspects of emergency and disaster communications most effectively has been a daily reminder. Latest hot topics include #VOST, Virtual EOCs (Emergency Operations Centres), Twitter Alerts, Digital Humanitarian Support and more, including the use of Partners tasked to help manage situational awareness and public engagement in complex environments. As this social convergence is taking place, what exactly is the role of new technology in Australia, how it developing and what are the challenges?

Join us on the #SMEMau tag as we explore the issues.

10 Questions (subject to change)

  1. How has the use of social media in emergency management in Australia changed in the past year?
  2. Social media lends itself well to community recovery. How can we encourage its use to enable people to help each other?
  3. Many people reach out for help with pets/livestock.  How does social media assist in the management of animals during disasters?
  4. Emergency hashtags are an often-overlooked component of a communication strategy. Is your organization prepared with an emergency hashtag strategy?
  5. Do you use infographics to communicate with the public?
  6. Do you use press releases and infographics during your activations to inform the press/ public?
  7. What social media tools do you provide the public to help them prepare for disasters?
  8. Do you engage digital volunteers during a disaster? If so who?
  9. What social media tools do you promote to help the public help themselves and each other in the recovery phase?
  10. Hot topics: UAV use, Twitter Alerts, Project Self-Serve and more.

Additional questions? You can submit those in advance here: http://bit.ly/1tzmTsY

Further Information and useful AU Resources

The Australian Emergency Management Knowledge Hub provides research, resources and news relevant to Australian emergency management and includes statistics and information, photos, video and media about past disaster events.

2013 TASMANIAN BUSHFIRE INQUIRY RECOMMENDATIONS AND RESPONSE

The Tasmanian Government accepted 72 recommendations and approved-in-principle the remaining 31 recommendations; further consultation will decide how they are to be implemented. Of the 103 recommendations, 31 have been prioritised for immediate implementation and, where possible will be implemented before the end of 2013.

  • Recommendation #71: That Tasmania Fire Service and Tasmania Police review their use of modern forms of communication with the community,  including social media, and commit resources to fully use this capability where appropriate.
  • Recommendations #43: That emergency management plans specifically include processes for effectively engaging with local communities and using community resources, including volunteers.

Goals and Objectives (Click for complete information)

Q&A Format

Questions will be posted by @VOST1 using the convention Q1, Q2 etc. Since multiple conversations may be happening simultaneously, please preface your answer with A1, A2 etc. Answers can be given in real time or at a more convenient time and archives will be posted after the event.

With Thanks to Our Partners

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Project EPIC

VOST Vic

 

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VSOG #SMEMau Event Committee

Moderator: @VOST1 Facilitators: Joanna Lane @joannalane, Robert Dunne @Academy911, Daniel Eshuis @deshuis, Brad Lemon @tyabblemons, Caroline Milligan @Caz_Milligan, Eileen Culleton @eileenculleton, Nathan Hunerwadel, Cédric Moro @MORO_CEDRIC, Lise St. Denise


Photo Credits: http://www.emknowledge.gov.au/media/69495/third-draft-blog-size-1300-x-460.jpg


tags: #SMEMau, #em2au

#SMEMau Australian Disasters – 2nd Annual #SMEMchat Special Event

Guest Post by: Joanna Lane, Virtual Operations Support Group (VOSG)

Open Invitation

Injured wombat and kangaroo

Where

On Twitter, event hashtag: #SMEMau

For those new to twitter, follow the discussion at http://bit.ly/RPe6ow or search for the #SMEMau hashtag

When

Friday 9th May 2014 – 0900 to 1030 Australia AET

Thursday 8th May 2014 – 1900 to 2030 US EDT

For other time zones: www.timeanddate.com

The purpose of the #SMEMau Special Event is to create an open learning forum about the role of Social Media in Emergency Management in Australia and to assist Australia to become a more proactive, disaster resilient country. Challenges in Emergency Management (AU) include:

  • Incorporating social media into catastrophic and large-scale events
  • Maintaining situational awareness in complex environments
  • Coordinated operations and integrated doctrine
  • Exploring models (such as VOST) to surge capability and capacity
  • Exploring partnerships with NGO & private sector

Map Jan 2014 BOMParticipants are invited to share lessons learned, accomplishments and new initiatives in the context of all incidents including recent wildfire, cyclone, tsunami and other severe weather events, from across Australia and beyond.

Goals
  • To provide clarification of the effectiveness of social media in disasters and its contribution to relief across the full spectrum of preparedness, response, and recovery mission efforts.
  • To provide participants direct insight from practitioners “directly engaged on the ground” in Australia as to how and when Social Media is being employed in their efforts.
  • To provide participants a forum to ask questions and offer comments or solicit additional feedback in real time based on their understanding of how Social Media is being implemented.
  • To identify best practices and share lessons learned in the use of Social Media in a regional or nationally significant catastrophic event.
  • To demonstrate the use of real-time Twitter search to find disaster traffic, as proposed by Project Self-Serve.
Objectives

10415767646_15928ae175_bAt the conclusion of this #SMEMau Special Event participants will gain new insight into the utility of Social Media in Emergency Management and understand how and when it can be most effectively utilized based on a real world event. New techniques, learned over the last 12 months, will be shared.

Participants will better understand the barriers and challenges to the effective use of Social Media and how; or if those obstacles can be successfully overcome while simultaneously managing a regional or nationally significant catastrophic event.

Based on the insight and knowledge gained through engaging in this #SMEMau Special Event, participants will be better prepared to plan and execute a Social Media Emergency Management Strategy and Plan in their local areas for disasters which they are directly impacted by or responsible for.

Participants will recognize the benefit and value of #SMEMau as a premier source of information, knowledge, and insight into the emerging and evolving field of Social Media in Emergency Management, and will return often to both participate and contribute, and expand the base of participation by inviting those in their own networks to become involved and participate as well.

Who Should Attend

13782083785_530c785cec_bAnyone curious about or engaged in social media for emergency management in all phases of emergency and disaster, including:

  • emergency managers
  • public information officers
  • media journalists and bloggers
  • SMEM and VOST practitioners, consultants and trainers
  • social media operators
  • health professionals and hospital crisis managers
  • media liaison staff
  • councils / shires
  • animal welfare agencies
  • elected officials from VIC / NSW / QLD / TAS / SA / WA / NT / ACT
  • non-government organisations
  • digital volunteers
  • technology partners
Questions

Please use this form to submit questions in advance: http://bit.ly/1tzmTsY

Further Reading

Links to what we did last year. 2013 #SMEMau Australia Bushfires Complete Archives: http://bit.ly/14mtmuJ 2013 Storify: http://bit.ly/Pxk8rU

vosglogo-120hVOSG 2014 Event Committee: Joanna Lane, Robert Dunne, Brad Lemon, Daniel Eshuis, Eileen Culleton, Caroline Milligan, Cedric Moro, Nathan Hunerwadel, Lise St. Denis

Please join us!


Photo Credits

Injured wombat and kangaroo joeys rescued from the Riddles Creek fire convalesce at Pastoria East Wildlife shelter. Picture: Rob Leeson Source: News Limited:  http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/bushfire-watch-warnings-remain-in-place-across-victoria-as-bushfires-continue-to-burn/story-fnl2cq7o-1226821646947

Map Jan 2014: Australian Bureau of Meteorology

Bushfires Oct 2013: https://www.flickr.com/photos/garyhayes/10415767646/in/set-72157636648984283/

Tropical Cyclone Ita Off-Shore Queensland, Australia: NASA/NOAA via NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory Credit: NASA/NOAA via NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory

#SMEM Directory

Guest Post by: Catherine Graham, Humanity Road

wiki20SMEMWe have published our Humanity Road USA #SMEM directory!  There are over 3,000 counties in the USA – Finding the right information fast in disaster is important.  Our mission at Humanity Road is to connect the public to information they need on how to survive, sustain and reunite.  In pursuit of that Humanity Road has been collating information on official social media emergency management accounts and using this list at the onset of disaster.

We are pleased to announce that in partnership with Emergency 2.0 Wiki and through the Humanitarian Toolbox initiative in a hackathon held this weekend in Austin, TX this information has now been published to a public directory with Emergency 2.0 Wiki.  This is the first step in creating the USA #SMEM directory and it is the largest directory of its kind for USA based social media accounts.  As social media emergency management accounts grow, so will this directory.

Humanity Road is committed to preparedness, response and process improvement in response to disaster.  It’s through process improvement that we gain headway in mitigating loss of life and property and help catalyze the recovery.  In transitioning this important directory to the public domain we also are launching an SMEM Directory forum for page administration roles for each state and USA territories.   The following pages have been published:

Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Districts & Territories:  American SamoaDistrict of Columbia, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Marshall Islands, Minor Outlying Islands, Northern Marianas, Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands

As you can see it was a large undertaking! We wish to thank all those volunteers who have spent many many hours collecting this data and to the development team who gave up their weekend to make this directory a reality.  We extend a special thank you to Katelyn Keegan who initiated this project, and to Robin Smith who truly helped make it a reality through her many hours of research and tenacity.

Humanitarian Toolbox logoA big thank you to @ClearMeasure  @jeffreypalermo  @mattsell  @phredAustin in Austin Texas for hosting the hackathon that helped make it a reality as well as @EileenCulleton with @Emergency20wiki and @TonySurma with the Humanitarian Toolbox team.  The Humanitarian Toolbox  http://www.htbox.org/ project is proving that when disaster strikes, code saves lives! The Humanitarian Toolbox is a sustained effort to leverage technology and skilled volunteer communities to solve the needs of response organizations and communities affected by natural disasters.  The creation of this directory is a good example of the benefits that can be achieved through such a valuable program.

It’s important to maintain and grow the directory as the field of Social Media in emergency response grows.   If you are interested in being listed as your state liaison for the #SMEM Directory sign up here http://bit.ly/SMEMDir

A huge thanks to the volunteer team at Humanity Road for your daily commitment to humanity!

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